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on life, ambitions, and dreams

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Posts Tagged ‘ambition’

Musings on Adulthood and Ambition

Lazy Sunday: bed, newspaper, cherry-cheesecake

You wake up one morning to the sound of birds chirping outside of your window at 4:45am, roll over for a few more hours, then decide to get out of bed because you can’t sleep anymore and it’s barely 8am on a Sunday morning.

This, my friends, is a sign that you’re an adult.

My husband and I progress through life at lightning speed. Rarely is there an evening or a weekend when we aren’t playing, hustling, or catching up on housework so that our neighbors don’t hate us. There’s a word I like to use to describe our life, and it’s a word that’s somewhere between the sound of a 20-something treading water and ambitious, driven, have-it-all-figured-out adults. And lately I’ve been more of the first one than the latter.

But what does ambition look like?

Ambition is…

Over the past few weeks, there have been three blog posts and articles that I’ve read that are musings around the word “ambition” and what it looks like for different people.

The first by Deena Varshavskaya, the founder and CEO of Wanelo. In her post, Startup CEOs, Stop Acting Like Victims, she is shouting at all of the other startup CEOs who to stop looking for pity about the journey that they have chosen. Let’s face it, if you’ve chosen to have an idea and bring it to life, you’ve chosen a very risky, hard life because you can’t see yourself doing anything but chasing that dream. Get on the ambition train or get off of it.

The second two articles were lists of rules about things to do and not to do, courtesy of what each author has learned in the past. The first list, 27 Dos and Don’ts for Being a Badass Woman, is by Justine Musk, a writer who blogs for creatives. And the second list, 20 Things I Should Have Known at 20, is by Julien Smith, a bestselling author who writes about the digital space. Both lists are rules that have a lot to do with looking back, reflecting, and moving forward. (more…)

Sunday Serial: Babies, Wanting & Antisocial Behavior

As the Waves Roll In, Casey David:Casey Muir-Taylor

Hey, did you hear that my blog turned two this past week? I wish I could tell you that I’ve been celebrating by stuffing my face with all sorts of metaphorical cake – but I haven’t. Instead I’ve been reading, and here is the best of that I encountered last week.

Babies can understand what you’re saying at just 6 months old by Robert T. Gonzalez on iO9

Read this because: You have babies, or you don’t, but you are curious about how the developing mind works. This article is about a recent study that shows that babies, as young as six months old, are able to identify nouns when associated to objects. Fascinating.

How Bad Do You Want It? By Sam Davidson on Sam Davidson

Read this because: You’ve heard the story about young business man who meets a guru on a beach, but you’ve never read it before – Sam shares this story on his blog with some advice:

“When a want is unmet, we may feel uncomfortable. We might get sad or upset. Life can continue. But when a need is unmet – we suffer. We cringe, react, and are thrown off course. Something is amiss and we have to set everything else aside until we fix it.

Get rid of your wants. Start needing your dreams. Until you can’t go another day without chasing a passion, you’ll never lace up your shoes and get going. Once it becomes crucial to your happiness and wellbeing, then you’re ready to run.”

How Social Media Can Makes Us Antisocial by Tac Anderson on NewCommBiz

Read this because: You believe that social media has changed the world for the better. But then why are you sitting at home on a Friday night surfing Facebook to see who’s doing what or who’s also online in hopes that someone will send you a Facebook message?

Social media, while it gives us access to the lives of our “friends,” isn’t really all that social. It gives the appearance of being social, but in reality, it distances us from them and them from us. You have over 500 friends on Facebook, but when was the last time you called one of them to wish them a happy birthday in real life?

What did you read this week?

Photo Credit: Casey David

The Four Key Players in Launching an Idea

314 || 365 Breath of Life, another.point.in.time

Ambition and passion is infectious. And it’s the one ailment that I want to catch. And catch, and catch, and catch again. And no, I do not want a vaccine for it. Ever.

I’ve written about this before, in my own metaphoric ramblings, and I caught a whiff of it this weekend.

A friend-quaintance asked me to meet over coffee, to pick my brain about how to incorporate social media into the launch strategy for his stealth startup. The startup is a technological solution to a problem that he and his friends deal with everyday. His idea will streamline and simplify things. I have no idea how original it is, but that isn’t why he asked me for coffee.

As he talked through his pitch and outlined his plan, I could see the temperature of his thoughts and his words rise—there was something behind what he talked about that is more than just an idea. He has a plan, an ambition to create something, and the drive to get him and his business partner there.

Passion.

We all talk about it, but how many of us actually listen to the voice inside us that says, “Hey, you’ve got something there,” and go after it? And how many of us pause when we hit the wall and ask others for help on figuring out how to climb over it or knock it down?

The Four Key Players

When it comes to an idea about creating a new product, starting a movement, or creating a legacy, there are four key players who ensure its success. They are:

Founder – This is the person who caught the bolt of lightning during the “Ah ha!” moment and decided to run with it. More than likely the founder is the person who has the mad skills to build the product or the idea and take it to launch, but may not know exactly how.

Producer – This is the person behind the founder who is responsible for “making it happen” so that the Founder and the other key players can concentrate on the product itself. They are the connector. They know whom you should talk to, when you should talk to them, and how you should talk in a way that will net you the resources that you need, when you need them.

Board of Directors – This is a fancy word for mentors. They are the group of people who have done what you are about to do and can guide you through your successes and your failures as you march toward your goal. They believe in what you are setting out to do and if you’re lucky, they see a little bit of themselves in you, and that is their motivation to help you get to where you need to go.

Beta-Evangelists – Then, there is everyone else. These people are the rock stars who make up the support group that is attracted to your passion and sucks it up like a sponge. They are your friends, your fans, your audience, and your customers. They are first in line to test your product, your idea, and give you honest-to-God, straight-up feedback. They are your power-users, your pre-evangelists, your network, and they are more valuable than anyone else in this equation.

You are the founder of your own life and your own ideas. Most of the people who care about you will fit into the last category. And if you’re lucky enough, your spouse or your best friend will be your producer. The hardest thing about working this formula into your professional life—be it how to be successful at climbing the corporate ladder or thinking outside the 9-to-5 and launching your own venture–is taking the first step and voicing outloud, “I want help reaching [my big ambitious goal] and I was wondering if you could help me get there.”

Just Ask

Oh, baby, is it ever so hard to ask for help, especially when you bear your soul about something that is near and dear to you, like being more extraordinary than you already are.

It’s easy to have an idea, but it’s hard to take the first step towards speaking or actualizing that your idea can be something physical, something real, something more-than possible.

Real.

Do you have a personal Board of Directors? How did you go about asking those in your life for help in achieving the goals you only whisper?

Photo Credit: another.point.in.time