lamiki

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Posts Tagged ‘video’

How to Promote Your Blog Without Losing Your Soul: Video of my Talk

SlideShare says: Congratulations on your documents receiving over 10,000 views, lamiki!

I received this email from SlideShare* last month, congratulating my slides for reaching 10,000 views!

Woah, that’s amazing! I’d say that the presentations I gave at WordCamp Seattle and WordCamp Portland have been two of the most rewarding things that I’ve done in the past few months. For one thing, I was able to talk about two things that I’m super passionate about —marketing and blogging — to an audience of people who are passionate about creating content or enabling content creators. Plus, I was able to meet new people and have an amazing weekend with a close friend in Portland.

Okay, all that gushing aside, yesterday I released the video of How to Blog Every Day.

Now that your blogging chops are primed, here’s the video on How to Promote Your Blog Without Losing Your Soul from WordCamp Seattle back in May.

*The SlideShare content team does an amazing job communicating with their content creators. For example, they emailed me to let me know my deck was featured on their homepage. Another bonus point for them: emoticons in the subject line; how can I not be excited about that?!

Video of my talk, How to Promote Your Blog, at WordCamp Seattle

This presentation is packed with information and tactics that you can use today to promote your blog posts today. I outline how to build a community for your blog online, which social networks to use to amplify and promote your posts, and which social media networks you should concentrate on including where to post, when, how, and why.

This will either make your life easier, or increase your to-do list infinitely. And you thought writing blog posts was the hardest part. ;)

The presentation lasts 24 minutes and the next 17 minutes is mic’ed Q&A (which means you can actually hear the questions!).

Sorry about the dim lighting and if it’s hard to hear me, while I was incredibly nervous to be giving my first solo presentation, I was also recovering from a cold and my throat really wanted to close up on me (super annoying when you want to talk, for like, 45 minutes!). Slides are embedded below and you’re welcome to download and share them!

Related links and resources:

Did this presentation help you promote your blog?

My goal when giving a talk is to give you one thing that you can take away and apply to your own work. If this presentation helped you come up with one way to promote your blog, I’d love to hear about it, either in the comments or via email.

If you missed the video on How to Blog Every Day, head on over there and check it out!

UPDATE: This talk was chosen by WordPress.tv as one of the most popular videos from 2012!

How to Blog Every Day: Video of my Talk and More Resources to Help you Blog

Laura Kimball (lamiki) speaking at WCPDX

We all need a little push to get the creative juices going and, you know, write.

Two years ago a friend of mine came up with a crazy idea to blog every single day. It was a way to get both of us writing on a consistent basis. And it worked so well that every November I commit to writing and publishing a blog post every single day.

That experiment worked so well for me that I talked about it at WordCamp Portland last month. And guess what? The video from my talk, How to Blog Every Day, is now available!

Video of my talk, How to Blog Every Day, at WordCamp Portland

The talk lasts about 36 minutes, and is packed with ideas to help get you writing—either every day or simply every week. I’m embedding the video and the slides for you below (feel free to download and share). Once you’re finished watching the video, be sure to check out the extensive list of resources that were published with the original slides.

There was some great un-mic-ed discussion at the end of my talk during the Q&A, so and I tried to repeat anything that was said off-screen, but I apologize if there’s something you miss!

Thank you to Blaze Streaming Media for recording the video!

Want to blog every day and need ideas?

Here are two ideas that will help get you writing:

The Daily Post A project from WordPress.com filled with ideas, prompts, and even writing challenges with the soul purpose to keep bloggers blogging.

Join a daily blogging challenge – Every once in a while an organization will start a month-long writing series where they will release prompts daily and invite bloggers to write about it. It’s a great way to give you ideas of what to write. You can either search out a new writing series or check out prompts from the archives of past writing events. For example, check out the prompts from Trust30 and Reverb11 to get started (links go to the archives).

If you’re interested in blogging every day this November (or any month), leave a comment with a link to your blog! I’m collecting a small team of daily bloggers and want to follow you, too! :)

Next up, the video from my presentation at WordCamp Seattle, How to Promote Your Blog Without Losing Your Soul.

The Value of Online Friendships and IRL

bff, by eflon

Two years ago at SXSW I met two people in real life for the first time. After meeting each other, we didn’t have that awkward “getting to know you” phase, instead we were chained to the hip debriefing about sessions and mapping out how each of us were going to make our impact in the world. When we’d meet new people and they asked how we met, we’d answer simultaneously, “On Twitter!”

“You mean you didn’t just meet here?”

Well, sorta. You see, the three of us had been talking for two years online and SXSW happened to be the first time that we were all in the same physical room together.

We joked that we were “IRL-ing,” which is the active verb of spending time “in real life” together as opposed to online. And it was fun, too.

Think about the closest friends that you have, the ones that you can share anything with. Now think about how long it took you to get to that point of comfort with your friend. Years, probably.

Friends vs. Friendship

Yesterday, Monica Guzman wrote about the term “friends” and how in the age of social media, are all of the “friends” that we have online actually friends, or just people we know who we call friends?

She writes about the difference between friends and the role of friendship:

How many people can I turn to in a crisis? A small group of family and close friends I’d think to reach out to — if I keep the trouble offline.

But if I take it online, if I decide that’s all right, it’s all of them plus an unpredictable number of other friends, acquaintances, professional contacts and even strangers who might help, maybe more quickly or more effectively than the people I know and see the most.

These tech-connected “friends” won’t ever replace the flesh-and-blood people with whom we form deep, enduring relationships. But they can act the part a time or two, and even audition for a permanent role….

So are people friends if they act like friends for a moment here, an hour there? Can we draw clean lines between our networks and our friends once and for all?

No, we can’t, and maybe we shouldn’t. Because when we’re so connected, the prevalence of friends doesn’t matter nearly as much as the prevalence of friendship.

The question about if a person is really a friend or not is something that we’ve all wondered for years (just ask any heart-broken teenager). But are the conversations and relationships we have and build online real or not?

Stop Valuing IRL Over Your Online Life

My friend Mouyyad of IRL-ing fame sent me this video of Alexandra Samuel’s talk at TEDxVictoria in which she gives Ten Reasons to Stop Apologizing for Your Online Life (video embedded below). She says:

We are so used to apologizing for our online reality that we actually have an acronym for it: I. R. L., in real life. And you see people all over the Internet itself using this acronym to say, ‘What I’m doing right now online does not count. It’s not real. Reality happens elsewhere.

Wait, so that conversation that I had with someone last week on Twitter that turned into a freelance project wasn’t real? And the person who I met two years ago online who’s turned into one of my closest most trusted friends, isn’t real?

Alexandra’s talk is centered on the idea of “Real Life Too,” a new acronym to embrace and properly recognize all those activities that we do online as being real.

That anonymous person who left a hateful comment on your blog? They’re real. That blogger you’ve been connecting with who lives on the other side of the world? They’re real. That person who lives in your same city who you’ve tweeted with at events but have never shook hands? They’re real, too.

Alexandra Samuel: Ten Reasons to Stop Apologizing for Your Online Life at TEDxVictoria

I still love the term “IRL” because to the friends who I have IRL-ed with, it’s a joke. After building up trust and being our real selves with each other online for years, we were able to skip the awkwardness that comes with meeting people for the first time and jump right into being “friends.” We know that where our friendship started, online, is as real as what happens offline.

I think about all of the “friends” I have on Facebook and how many of them I’m actually friends with, care about, or are just “friends” with because I’m curious to watch what they do in their life. All of that is real, and just because the interactions that we have with each other happen online doesn’t make it any less real.

What do you think, is online life as real as offline life?

Photo by eflon

StrengthsTalk Google+ Hangout on Blogging

Today I had the pleasure of “hanging out” on Google+ as part of StrengthsTalk, which is show for StrengthsFactors.

Our host was Will Deyamport, III of StrengthsFactors and peoplegogy and participants included Krystle Rory of Kriss Did It, Leah Olson of LeahROlson.com (who I got to meet this past weekend down at WordCamp!), and yours truly.

Bloggers Talking about Blogging

Our topic was about all things blogging — why we started blogging, what platform we blog on, do we self-identify as a blogger, how we find time to blog, and tips for people who want to blog.

The hang out is 32 minutes long, and if you’re interested in blogging, I highly recommend that you watch it (and, of course, I am a tad bias).

What tips do we have for people who are considering blogging?

Blog about what you’re passionate about. Don’t blog for money, that hardly ever works out. When you blog about what you’re passionate about, blogging is not easy, but it does take a lot of time and dedication. – Krystle

Don’t blog because everyone else is blogging. If this is something that you want to do, do it. If you want to start blogging because everyone else is doing it, don’t. – Laura

Don’t feel intimidated by blogging. It is putting your writing and your thoughts out there, but it doesn’t have the same formality as putting your writing into a newspaper or a magazine. – Leah

Best takeaway from Krystle about when she blogs: “When life happens, I blog.

I want that on a t-shirt.

Many thanks to Will for inviting me to be part of this hangout and thank you to Leah for giving a shout-out to my WordCamp talk on How to Blog Every Day. :)

Why do you blog?