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Posts Tagged ‘social good’

Steve Jobs and Movember: Time to Get your Mustache on

Something magical has happened in my house since the night Steve Jobs died – and I’m not talking about the top 40 pop music that’s flowing up the stairs from my husband’s office into mine as I write this, but what he’s doing while listening to it.

He’s drawing.

The Evolution of an Artist

My husband, John, has always been a creative-type. By day and trade he’s a graphic designer, but he always had ambitions of being an artist. But no one ever told him that he could. So he pursued the next best thing, design. And he’s good at it.

For as long as I’ve known him, John has been a designer and an illustrator. But it wasn’t until he sat down, moved by the news of losing our generation’s Gutenberg, Edison, Picasso, Carnegie, that he drew this tribute to Steve Jobs and something inside of him opened up.

Over the past two months, John has been drawing almost every night and this month, he’s decided to sell a limited number of Steve Jobs’ Tribute Prints to benefit Movember. While pancreatic cancer took one of the most inspiring innovators of our time, John wanted to do something and help raise money to make sure that other men are not taken before their time like Steve Jobs was.

Why you should care about Movember

John Kimball Holding Steve Jobs Tribute Artwork

Movember is the month formerly known as November and is dedicated to growing moustaches and raising awareness and funds for men’s health issues; specifically cancers affecting men. To show my support for the men in my life, I have signed up as a Mo Sista. 

Why do I care about men’s health?

Because:

  • 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime
  • A man is diagnosed with prostate cancer every 2.2 minutes
  • 1 in 2 men will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime
  • 24% of men are less likely to go the doctor compared to women

Those statistics suck.

John’s three-weeks into growing his ‘stache, but tragically, even though I’m a Mo Sista, I can’t grow a mustache. It’s physically impossible. So instead, I’m asking you to support our Movember campaign in two ways:

Support our Movember campaign through a donation – If you would like to and can, please make a tax-deductible donation of $5, $10, or $25 to our Movember campaign.

Or if you’re a charitable geek at heart –

Steve Jobs spotted in the wildPurchase a limited edition of John’s Steve Jobs Tribute print – You can purchase the print through his etsy store or by contacting me directly. All proceeds of the prints go directly to the Movember campaign and will be mailed out at the end of the month. You can purchase a 12” x 12” print on Luster paper or a 16” by 16” on Canvas. All prints are individually signed and numbered.

In case you’re wondering, the print looks amazing in person.

Time to get your Mo on

We only have one more week to grow and support these Movember moustaches, so please come along for the ride. And John will not be selling this print once Movember ends.

Funds raised during Movember will help make a tangible difference to the lives of others. Through the Movember Foundation and their men’s health partners, the Prostate Cancer Foundation and LIVESTRONG, Movember is funding world-class awareness, research, educational and support programs, which would otherwise not be possible. 

For more details on how the funds raised from previous campaigns have been used and the impact Movember is having, please click on the links below:

Thank you for donating at our campaign and for helping me change the face of men’s health. Go the Mo!

Why I am a Mo SistaSteve Jobs Tribute Art auctioned at Seattle Geek Roast

I’m a wife and a daughter who has a dad, grandpas, brothers-in-law, uncles, cousins, one adorable nephew, and numerous amazing male friends. I care and love each and every one of them and want to do what I can help change the face of men’s health.

Are you with me? 

If so, you know what to do – donate, buy, or help me spread the word about this campaign.

Thank you.

Dear SXSW PanelPicker Haters

haters gonna hate meme

This week the 2012 SXSW PanelPicker went live and the chaos of shameless self-promotion began.

The goal – for people who submitted panels – is to throw your panel to the masses and increase your 1 out of 3,155 chance of your SXSW Interactive panel actually getting selected for the main programming at the festival. And the goal, for all of those who didn’t submit a panel, is to chime in on the programming and have a voice in what they’ll pay money to go see in March.

Full disclosure – I submitted a panel to SXSW 2012 (the best one ever, of course!).

Haters gonna hate

Throughout the week there have been a number very open conversations online about how much people hate the entire SXSW process. And I’m talking hate in the deep down, I’m-gonna-unfollow-you, kind of hate. This whole panel picking process is a popularity contest. And how pathetic and obnoxious it is that people are asking others to vote and retweet the ask to vote for their panel? How horrible is it that SXSW is asking people to promote their festival when the majority of these people won’t even get chosen to speak?

It is sad, and I get where those haters are coming from.

On the one hand, festival organizers who ask their community to make a decision about their programming is a cop-out. (Isn’t that their job?) But, let’s be real here, how many other organizations ask us to do the exact same side-show ask-for-votes thing? How many times has popularity been the deciding factor between if you get something or not?

Things like the chance to win a charitable grant, industry awards, a job, and even (cringe) an internship.

Vote-for-me campaigns are everywhere and it’s all about tapping your network in the right kind of way in order to get them your friends to do what you want – vote and share that they voted for you, a lot.

Don’t hate the player, hate the game

SXSW panelpicker pie chartAccording to SXSW, this whole voting exercise only carries 30% of the weight for whether a panel is a go or a no-go. Here’s the history on the PanelPicker and why SXSW is letting the community (oh, hey, that’d be you and me) have a voice in the programming:

Over the years, many of the most compelling panels and presentations for the SXSW Interactive Festival have come directly from our community. This process was formalized in 2007 with the launch of the PanelPicker, an innovative online tool developed to enhance community participation in SXSW. The PanelPicker enables the community in two ways. First, it offers the community the opportunity to suggest programming ideas. Second, it allows the community the power to review, comment and vote for those ideas they most want to see become a part of the event.

SXSW is a “community-driven event.” As a member of this community, don’t you want to have a voice in the kind of panels and talks that get primary real estate on the stages in March? Don’t you want to help decide what talks are innovative and worth your time and the dollars you spend for your badge?

Don’t you want to say after that panel that sucks in March, “Well, I didn’t vote for him!”?

So, will you vote for my panel?

Vote for my SXSW idea 2012

I wouldn’t do this post justice if I didn’t ask for you to vote for my panel – Change Makers: How Nonprofits Create Change Online.  Here’s the description:

Through social media, nonprofits can launch a movement, create buzz around a cause, and build a community. But how do you make sure that members of your community aren’t slactivists who “like” your organization but don’t do anything to help you reach your mission? How do you convert those social “do-gooders” into helping you create change? Join us as we discuss how three organizations have figured out how to ignite their communities and leverage their online platforms to create change through volunteerism at VolunteerMatch, crowdsourced fundraising at GiveForward, and small-scale donations at Jolkona. Come ready to interact, discuss, and figure out how to convert your supporters into active change agents for good.

This panel will include Frank Barry of Blackbaud, Robert Rosenthal of VolunteerMatch, Cate Conroy of GiveForward, and yours truly of Jolkona. The idea of this panel is to show how you can turn social media awareness into action get your fans and followers to do something online. We will feature real-world examples of how we do leverage our online platforms to create change.

This panel in the “Greater Good” tract with 149 other submissions.

What do you think about vote-for-me campaigns?

For obvious reasons I cannot take a neutral stance on this subject. So if you are involved or not involved in the madness that is the 2012 SXSW PanelPicker, have participated in a “vote for me to win ______” contest or not, what do you think about crowdsourcing for conference programming or awards?

Is asking the community to vote a good idea or a bad idea?  Is it a smart programming choice by the organizers or are they just asking us to do their work for them?

Mashable Article: How Non-Profits Can “Woo” Corporate Partners

Last Friday at 8am while John was making me breakfast, I started the computer and my TweetDeck notifications went wild all because my article, HOW TO: Choose & Approach a Corporate Partner for Your Non-Profit, had just been posted.

Mashable Social Good Screen shot 2011-05-30 at 11.24.27 PM

This is the first article I’ve had published on Mashable, and you can image how excited I was and still am. Here is an excerpt:

Making the First Move

Now that you have a list of corporations who would make a perfect match for your non-profit, it’s time to ask them out on the first date. Even though you’ll be dating the entire company, you’ll want to start with anyone who can get you in the door. Think of your first point of contact as your matchmaker.

First Date Rule: Keep it causal. Share with your matchmaker what you’re working on and why his company would be a good fit to sponsor your campaign and partner with your non-profit. Woo them.

Second Date Rule: If your matchmaker is interested and sparks fly, ask him for an introduction to the decision makers at the company and set up a formal meeting. If your matchmaker is truly passionate about your idea, invite him to be a part of this meeting as an advocate for the partnership. Again, woo them. Advocates are key.

You can read the rest of the article, including what to do on the third date, here.

How I Define Giving on World Give Day

This post is part of a blog series inspired by World Give Day and hosted by GiveForward and Jolkona. To find other posts in this series please visit www.worldgiveday.com or follow the hashtag #giveday.

One Dollar, Sir! by Stuck in Customs (Trey Ratcliff)

I am part of an amazing group of 20- and 30-somethings who are changing the world. It’s a movement that the media is trying to capture but something that is built within the DNA of the majority of people I know. No, we don’t all work for nonprofits or social enterprises, but there’s a strong need to dedicate our lives, our passions, and our careers to doing “good.”

You all know what this means for me as I’ve written about my adventures in philanthropy multiple times. But it goes beyond dedicating my time to a startup nonprofit, it’s about knowing that the work that motivates and drives me tracks towards something that is larger than myself. And my direct relationship with giving has fallen into one of three categories: I give my time, my money, and myself.

I give time – to help build organizations and to cultivate the next generation of philanthropists.

I give money – in small amounts for causes I’m passionate about like providing healthcare for mothers and newborns in India and when disaster strikes and money is the most effective way that I can help.

I give myself – to people I care about to help them create and ignite projects that they’re passionate about. I also give a shoulder or an ear when needed. I strategize over coffee instead of networking at parties. I am there when the people in my life need me.

This is how I make an impact and give.

Small donations are the backbone of philanthropy

I’m going to borrow the definition of Jolkona, which is a Bengali word that means, “drop of water.” It represents the idea that small-scale acts and donations can have a ripple effect of change.

For Jolkona, that’s an easy vision to see. With your gift to, say, ignite girls’ leadership in Pakistan, you will empower and mentor a young woman through leadership training to become an agent of change today and a leader of Pakistan tomorrow. When I was in school, I had many opportunities where I went on a leadership training that shaped how I saw the world and my role in it. Those things can leave a lasting impression on a person and challenge them to greatness. By supporting a project like that one through Jolkona, can you imagine the opportunity that you will create for one girl?

By giving one small donation for less than $100, I can make a huge impact in the world. And while I’m not at the place in my life where I can make a ton of these contributions every day, I can make small ones every so often and together, they’ll add up to something big.

World Give Day blog seriesWorld Give Day

Today, I’m proud to be a part of World Give Day, a day to encourage people to give – whether it’s by making a donation, through their time, or even a simple hug. I am excited that Jolkona is a partner and that many of our friends are celebrating by writing blogs dedicated to the theme of giving:

You can read more posts from World Give Day Blogger Buddies, here. Meanwhile, I need to decide how I will celebrate giving today.

How do you define giving? What can you give of yourself that will make someone else’s life a little bit richer?

Thank you, Ethan, Desiree, and Cate at GiveForward for organizing World Give Day!

Photo by: Stuck in Customs